Member Profile: Emily Florio

Florio_Emily_LinkedIn_(2017)
Emily Florio, a member of the Private Law Librarians & Information Professionals SIS, is the Vice President of the American Association of Law Libraries and Past President of the Law Librarians’ Society of DC. She is the Senior Research Services Manager at Hogan Lovells in Washington, DC.

Answers compiled by Megan Moltrup, Librarian at Baker & McKenzie LLP in Washington, DC. 

What would you name your autobiography?
With a Little Help from Family and Friends

If you could be any fictional character, who would you choose and why?
I think it would be great fun to be Mary Russell, a strong, independent female sleuth, and partner to Sherlock Holmes in the mystery series by Laurie King. She travels the world solving mysteries and when she needs a break, she goes to her home in the English countryside.

What’s the last photo you took on your phone?
Given that I’m responding during the pandemic and under the work from home order, there aren’t a lot of things to see, so my cat Mae gets her photo taken a lot.

What’s your favorite thing to do to relax?
For over 25 years, riding horses has been my favorite form of relaxation. I can’t say our thoroughbreds are always relaxing to ride, though being at the farm with all the animals and friends has continually brought me joy.

What is something you learned in the last year?
Being agile and willing will only help you in your career and life.

Have you ever had something happen to you that you thought was bad but it turned out to be for the best?
In my career I’ve had some horrifying bosses that tested my patience and ability to remain positive, though ultimately taught me how not to manage and certainly how not to “lead.” I do not miss those people, but am pleased that I learned something from the experience, which ultimately ushered in better and new opportunities.

What would you do for a career if you weren’t doing this?
Definitely something where I’d be surrounded by and playing with animals all the time. Maybe a zookeeper or owner of an animal sanctuary.

What’s your favorite thing about being involved with AALL?
Without a doubt it is the colleagues and dear friends that I’ve met throughout the years.

What advice would you give to recent new law librarians?
Get involved and volunteer! There are shorter and longer term opportunities at every level and it is a great way to learn about our library types, positions and opportunities. And if you don’t know where to begin, reach out for guidance. You’ll find that we’re a very welcoming, supportive and thoughtful group of people.

Final thoughts
I look forward to connecting with colleagues and friends, both those I know and those I haven’t met yet. I am humbled to have this exceptional opportunity and am graciously anticipating all we can do together.

Business as (Un)Usual: Library Business Continuity Amid COVID-19

By Ellyssa Valenti Kroski, Director of Information Technology/Marketing The New York Law Institute

We’re a private membership law library which serves law firms and law firm librarians by providing research assistance, document delivery, and access to remote databases. When Hurricane Sandy hit New York City in October, 2012, we were largely unprepared for what would follow.  The inability to physically access our building cut off access to our library’s email which was hosted in-house on our network, as was our application which provided remote access to all of our electronic resources for our members.  We also had a traditional POTS phone system in place, so answering patron phone calls was out of the question as well.  We really had to scramble in order to get temporary passwords issued so that patrons could still access our resources and post alternate phone numbers for contacting us on our website.  We did it, but it wasn’t easy and it wasn’t fluid.  We decided right then to start transforming our business model to one that was more conducive to business continuity in the face of crises, one that was independent of location.  Eight years later we were much better prepared for this emergency.

Here are some of the systems we changed and had in place which made transitioning to a remote work situation less of an ordeal as well as some tips for preparing your own library. Continue reading

Welcome to the 2019-2020 Dewey B Strategic Hits and Misses Survey

Reposted with permission from Jean O’Grady at Dewey B Strategic.   Jean is a member of the Private Law Librarians & Information Professionals Special Interest Section. 

Please take the 2019-2020 Dewey B Strategic Survey here. Review the 2019 highlights below and tell your colleagues about the best and the worst of 2019 in legal publishing and legal tech.

The Highlights 2019 was a relatively quiet launch year in legal technology and publishing.  The year opened with speculation about the impact of layoffs at Thomson Reuters. Mid-year Wolters Kluwer suffered a significant malware  attack on May 7 but was fully back online within a week.

LexisNexis announced the full integration of one of its oldest acquisitions. Courtlink which was acquired in 2001 was finally integrated into their flagship product Lexis Advance.  The market responded with mixed reviews.

Bloomberg re-branded itself as Bloomberg Information Group (BIG.) Sadly this signified the retirement of BNA ( Bureau of National Affairs) as a brand. Bloomberg had acquired BNA in 2011 add a significant library of secondary sources including newsletters and books. The full integration of BNA into the Bloomberg platform allowed the company to revert to the simplified pricing model they had pioneered during their launch into the online legal information market.

Fastcase continued an aggressive spree of acquisitions and alliances covering public records (TransUnion), bankruptcy forms, Expert witness information (Juris and Courtroom Insight)  and  legal news (Law Street Media) clearly positioning product to move into the large firm market.

The Year of the Brief Analyser. Casetext CARA which launched the first brief analysis tool in 2016  now has a competitor in the Westlaw Edge “Quick Cite tool.”  At the 2019 American Association of Law Libraries AALL Annual Conference both Bloomberg and LexisNexis previewed their brief citiator tools which are expected to launch in 2020.

Please respond to the survey here. The Survey will close on “leap day” February 29th.

LexisNexis ALM Study Measures Growth and Resistance of Analytics in the Practice and Business of Law

Reposted with permission from Jean O’Grady at Dewey B Strategic

Legal Analytics is changing the practice and business of law. LexisNexis has released its third annual survey. Bringing Analytics into Focus suggests that firms have reached a tipping point in embracing analytics in the business and practice of law with 90% of users reporting that analytics makes them more efficient and more effective. Here is a link to the full press release.

Survey Demographics 77% of the firms listed are listed in the Am Law 200. 70% of the respondents to this survey were attorneys representing over 25 different practice areas.

Librarians Deserve Credit. Since 75% of the responded cite an increase of analytics use at their firms, lawyer awareness of analytics is very high.  In most firms, Library and KM directors have brought in the analytics products and driven the awareness the report suggests that their efforts are paying off. Training and driving up use remains a challenge. LexisNexis’ integration of Lex Machina and Ravel (now Context) content into Lexis Advance is also driving awareness and lowering the “login” bar since lawyers don’t need a special password to see analytics in their research results.

“As the leader in legal analytics, we couldn’t be happier to see more law firms, attorneys and other legal professionals adopting these tools and finding new ways for the technology to add value to their business and profession,” said Sean Fitzpatrick, LexisNexis CEO, North American Research Solutions. “The legal industry’s most groundbreaking, innovative and impactful analytics solutions reside on our flagship Lexis Advance platform, enabling attorneys to do their work more efficiently, provide better client counsel and make more informed business decisions in today’s hyper-competitive environment.”

Use Cases No surprise all of the uses support the competitive needs lawyers as practitioners and rainmakers:

How Law Firms Us Legal Analytics

I have been an early promoter of the value of analytics and insights. I recall the early days of online usage — it took large law firms almost a decade to fully accept online research as delivering workflow efficiencies. Online research was viewed as “optional” for a long time. The current competitive marketplace has accelerated the embrace of analytics because they can position the firm for competitive advantage at even save a firm from humiliating meetings with clients who are armed with an analytics report on the firms litigation history.

How law firms use analytics

Lack of training is still an obstacle.  One of the most revealing charts illustrated the obstackes to adoption. Training was at the top of the list.

Obstacles to Adopting Analytics

Partners are the Most Resistant?

This finding really shocked me. In law firms that have not adopted analytics partners do not expect to be adopting analytics in the next two years!

Don’t plan to implement analytics

As a die hard fan of analytics in law, I am pleased with the progress in driving awareness and adoption. Legal analytics vendors need to continue to enhance transparency into any limitations in data or in the coding of the data to assure that lawyers know what they are looking at.

As the data sets grow the challenges will expand as well. No one can be complacent in the analytics market either buyers or sellers.

Download the full report here.

Talking Tech: The Evolving Market for Company Information

Reposted with permission from AALL Spectrum, Volume 24, Number 3 (January/February 2020), pgs. 31-33

By G. Patrick Flanagan, Research Analyst at BakerHostetler LLP

How information vendors and new technologies are impacting the way law librarians research and gather company information.

Legal information professionals frequently need to research information about  companies. We research adversaries and potential clients. We research industries and companies for academic projects. We investigate the vendors we hire. Technology innovations change the way companies record and publish information about their businesses. In turn, information vendors adapt to changing technology and provide innovative ways to make more information available. This column highlights some of those methods and points out potential future developments. Today, legal researchers are often most familiar with judicial and governmental sources that usually have official and structured publications. Information systems frequently marketed to financial and business professionals, however, often employ a more journalistic approach to corporate research and fact gathering. Understanding the use and benefits of these other approaches and tools is helpful given the ebbs and flows in the market for company information. Continue reading