Welcome to the 2019-2020 Dewey B Strategic Hits and Misses Survey

Reposted with permission from Jean O’Grady at Dewey B Strategic.   Jean is a member of the Private Law Librarians & Information Professionals Special Interest Section. 

Please take the 2019-2020 Dewey B Strategic Survey here. Review the 2019 highlights below and tell your colleagues about the best and the worst of 2019 in legal publishing and legal tech.

The Highlights 2019 was a relatively quiet launch year in legal technology and publishing.  The year opened with speculation about the impact of layoffs at Thomson Reuters. Mid-year Wolters Kluwer suffered a significant malware  attack on May 7 but was fully back online within a week.

LexisNexis announced the full integration of one of its oldest acquisitions. Courtlink which was acquired in 2001 was finally integrated into their flagship product Lexis Advance.  The market responded with mixed reviews.

Bloomberg re-branded itself as Bloomberg Information Group (BIG.) Sadly this signified the retirement of BNA ( Bureau of National Affairs) as a brand. Bloomberg had acquired BNA in 2011 add a significant library of secondary sources including newsletters and books. The full integration of BNA into the Bloomberg platform allowed the company to revert to the simplified pricing model they had pioneered during their launch into the online legal information market.

Fastcase continued an aggressive spree of acquisitions and alliances covering public records (TransUnion), bankruptcy forms, Expert witness information (Juris and Courtroom Insight)  and  legal news (Law Street Media) clearly positioning product to move into the large firm market.

The Year of the Brief Analyser. Casetext CARA which launched the first brief analysis tool in 2016  now has a competitor in the Westlaw Edge “Quick Cite tool.”  At the 2019 American Association of Law Libraries AALL Annual Conference both Bloomberg and LexisNexis previewed their brief citiator tools which are expected to launch in 2020.

Please respond to the survey here. The Survey will close on “leap day” February 29th.

Evaluating eBooks in Law Libraries

Ellyssa Kroski, Manager of Information Systems, New York Law Institute
ekroski@nyli.org | http://www.nyli.org | http://www.ellyssakroski.com

Bess Reynolds, Technical Services Manager, Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
breynolds@debevoise.com

Last week we had the pleasure of speaking at the Law Library Association of Greater New York (LLAGNY) education event: Going Digital – The Challenges of eBooks in Law Libraries. We discussed the current landscape of eBooks right now, the many vendors, publishers, and aggregators that are making these digital volumes available, the variety of pricing models employed, and criteria to determine which of these packages is right for your library. We tackled the current challenges and obstacles to be overcome by both private and academic law libraries interested in implementing an eBooks program. And finally we discussed what law libraries are doing to make eBooks available to their attorneys and patrons. Continue reading

The Value of Law Librarians Blogging on their Firm’s Blog

Cheryl Niemeier is Director of Library Services at Bose McKinney & Evans LLP  

Apparently, I am blazing a new trail as seemingly the first and only law librarian who is officially blogging on their firm’s blog page! “That’s huge!” said Greg Lambert of 3 Geeks and a Law Blog when he congratulated me on this new responsibility. The news also prompted Steve Lastres to ask me to write this guest blogger post describing the value proposition of law librarians blogging.  Continue reading

A Pro Bono Project Fit for a Library

Pamela Lipscomb is the Manager of Reference Services at Arent Fox LLP in Washington, DC.

In 1972, the nonprofit National Health Law Program started publishing An Advocate’s Guide to the Medicaid Program. What started out as an in-house project has developed into a comprehensive publication depended on by lawyers, journalists, researchers and community organizations. It was formally published in 1991 and has since been updated twice. When it came time to publish the fourth edition, NHeLP not only wanted to include the recent health reform legislation, but it also wanted to broaden the presence of the Advocate’s Guide to include a web-based product. Continue reading