ARK Group Conference to Highlight Role of the Modern Law Firm Librarian: Knowledge Management, Big data and Analytics, and Client-facing Solutions

The modern law firm librarian and legal information professional’s role continues to evolve along with the changing legal industry, and knowledge management, analytics, and client-facing solutions now occupy more and more of legal information professionals’ time.

The ARK Group’s 13th annual Law Firm Library, Research & Information Services conference brings together a group of legal information professionals to illuminate their changing roles, and to share their strategies and best practices for dealing with current challenges and opportunities.  Several members of the American Association of Law Libraries’ Private Law Librarians and Information Professionals’ section (PLLIP) will be among the speakers at the event, which will be held Thursday, February 21, at the SUNY Global Center in New York.

Below is a snapshot of the presentations. View the full agenda on the ARK Group site.

Opening Remarks – Conference Co-Chairs
Kris Martin, Senior Director, HBR Consulting, and Holly M. Riccio, Senior Manager, HBR Consulting 

Putting Intelligence in BP Decision Makers’ Hands 
Angela McKane, Lead, Technology Intelligence, BP 

Keeping Up With the Quants: Leveraging Data in Managing Departments
Kathryne L. Valentine, Director of Knowledge & Practice Innovation, Dentons US LLP

Partnering with Clients to Drive Practical Innovation
Toby Brown, Chief Practice Management Officer, Perkins Coie LLP, and Gwyneth McAlpine, Director of Knowledge Management Services, Perkins Coie LLP

There Are Always Two Sides to Every (KM) Story
Kathy Skinner, Director of Research & Information Services, White & Case LLP; Gina Lynch, Director of Knowledge Services, Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP; and Holly Riccio, Senior Manager, HBR Consulting 

Buyer Beware: Evaluating Analytics Products – How to Select an Analytics Product
Jean O’Grady, JD, MLS, Sr. Dir of Information, Research & Knowledge Management, DLA Piper LLP (US); Diana J. Koppang, Director of Research & Competitive Intelligence, Neal, Gerber & Eisenberg LLP; and June H. Liebert, Firmwide Director of Library and
Research Services, Sidley Austin LLP

Time for a Little Library R&R (Recovery & Revenue) 
Greg Lambert, Chief Knowledge Services Officer, Jackson Walker LLP, and Lee Bernstein, Library Manager, Haynes & Boone, LLP 

Who moved my cheese? How firm libraries create new top-line (and bottom-line) value
Ron Friedmann, Chief Knowledge & Information Officer, LAC

Kill the Library, Elevate the Service…
Huu Nguyen, Partner, Squire Patton Boggs (US) LLP; Scott D. Bailey, Global Director of Research Services, Squire Patton Boggs (US) LLP;  Nancy Rine, Director of Research Services and Conflicts, Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver &  Jacobson LLP; and Thao Tran, KM Manager, Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver &  Jacobson LLP

 

Legalweek NY’s Knowledge Manager Day–Highlighting Private Law Librarians and Information Professionals’ Role

legalweek.jpg
The American Association of Law Libraries (AALL), and members of AALL’s Private Law Librarians and Information Professionals section will be out in force at Legalweek NY 2019 for Knowledge Manager Day on Thursday, January 31.  Eight law firm knowledge and research services directors are scheduled to present and will discuss how to encourage adoption of new tools and how knowledge management efforts can benefit clients through improved procedures and better information flows / targeted knowledge delivery.

 
FROM CONVERSATION TO CONVERSION: GETTING LAWYERS TO USE NEW TOOLS

Presented by AALL members:

  • Cynthia Brown, Director of Research Services, Littler Mendelson P.C.
  • Jean O’Grady, Senior Director of Research and Knowledge, DLA Piper LLP
  • June Liebert, Firmwide Director of Library and Research Services, Sidley Austin LLP
  • Cheryl Smith, Director of Information Services, O’Melveny & Myers LLP

Summary:

Costs are exploding. Staffing is tight. Budgets need to be maintained. Whether you buy or build new legal knowledge and technology products, there is no guarantee of adoption. Email announcements remain unopened. The promise of food will not get associates to a conference room anymore. What is the answer? A panel of seasoned knowledge professionals will outline some of the techniques they use to drive, monitor, and assess adoption of new tools.

Takeaways:

  1. Identify potential obstacles to new product adoption
  2. Discuss best practices in the selection of products or initiatives
  3. Discover strategies for driving adoption and communicating more effectively
  4. Utilize metrics to gauge success and identify potential learning opportunities


JOINING FORCES–CREATING CLIENT-CENTRIC KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

Presented by AALL members:

  • Scott Bailey, Global Director of Research Services, Squire Patton Boggs (US) LLP
  • Marlene Gebauer, Director of Knowledge Solutions, Greenberg Traurig, LLP
  • Steve Lastres, Director of Knowledge Management Services, Debevoise & Plimpton LLP
  • Saskia Mehlhorn, US Director, Knowledge Services, Norton Rose Fulbright US LLP

Abstract:

Knowledge management (KM) has made its way into law firms and proven to be imperative to achieve efficiency and integrate workflows. Now more and more law firms are working to bring the KM processes and tools they developed in front of their clients, creating and adding value to key relationships. Join for a panel discussion that will provide a succinct overview of KM in law firms and present examples of such collaborative efforts ranging from improved procedures to bespoke client portals.

Takeaways:

  1. Gain a greater understanding of KM initiatives in law firms
  2. Explore opportunities to deepen existing client relationships through KM engagement
  3. Meet leaders engaged in collaborative projects and share guidance

THE DETAILS

WHAT: AALL Legalweek New York 2019
WHEN:  Knowledge Manager Day, January 31
WHERE:  New York Hilton Midtown

Register today and join us as we celebrate the legal information professionals who help law firms win and keep the business of law moving forward.

Data-Driven Decision-Making: Getting Started with Reference Tracking Systems & Data Analytics

Reposted with permission from AALL Spectrum, Volume 23, Number 1 (September/October 2018), pgs. 20-23.

By Amy Atchison, Associate Law Librarian for Public Services at the University of California Irvine School of Law Library, and June H. Liebert, Firmwide Director of Library & Research Services at Sidley Austin LLP

We both started as research librarians at the University of California Los Angeles Law Library more than 20 years ago. Back then, we tracked reference desk requests each day with tick marks on a sheet of paper. We refer to this now as “data gathering for dummies.” While this simple method recorded the number of requests in a given time period, it provided almost zero value (how often do tick marks ever get aggregated?), and we lost the most useful information, such as the questions and the answers.

Faculty submitted requests almost exclusively via email or phone back then, which is still true today. Our biggest innovation at the time was to print each unassigned faculty request and tape it to an old file cabinet with the idea that a visual of our growing workload would encourage us to take more requests. The unintended effect was group avoidance of the file cabinet and a de facto game of chicken with the faculty requests.

Time passed and things got better. Although we now work at two very different  institutions—a law school and a law firm—both of our libraries must run efficiently and cost-effectively while still exceeding our users’ expectations. One way we accomplish this is by tracking research requests in an online system that provides us with the data we need to better understand our users, staff, and organizations. Continue reading

Law Librarians: Keeping The Industry Honest

Reposted with permission from Robert Ambrogi’s LawSites

By Robert Ambrogi

I’ve just returned from a much-too-brief visit to the annual conference of the American Association of Law Libraries in Baltimore. Although the conference started Saturday, family obligations kept me away until Monday. Then yesterday, flight cancellations along the east coast had me scrambling for a route home, forcing me to leave much earlier than I’d planned to catch the Amtrak to Boston.

Pretty much all I managed to do, therefore, was explore the exhibit hall and speak with vendors there.  From my vantage point, that’s a good thing. As I wrote after last year’s conference, AALL’s annual convention has evolved into one of the leading conferences for legal technology.

The reason for this is partly due to the evolving role of the law librarian. Back in 2014, I wrote about the changing role of law librarians, concluding, “To my mind, there has never been a more exciting or important time to be a legal information professional.” Four years later, that is even more true. As I said in last year’s post, law librarians wear an increasing number of hats these days, and a major one is legal technologist.

Hand in hand with the changing role of law librarians is the fact that information science itself is being radically transformed by technology. The buzzwords permeating this conference were the same you’ll hear at any legal technology conference — artificial intelligence, analytics, blockchain. But this is buzz with real substance behind it. Advances in technology are driving advances in legal research and even redefining the meaning and scope of what we’ve traditionally considered legal research to be.

In this regard, it says something about the state of innovation in law that prominent among those showing off leading-edge technologies at AALL were two of the industry’s most-established companies — Thomson Reuters with its AI-powered Westlaw Edge and LexisNexis with its new Lexis Analytics suite.

I was able to catch up with both companies at AALL and also see more of two new LexisNexis products, Context, which rolls out in September and will help lawyers understand what language judges find most persuasive, and Lexis Search Advantage | Transactional Powered by Intelligize, which is now available and allows firms to mine rich information out of internal document collections. (See this post for more.)

I also got the chance to see a demo of another new product I recently wrote about, the Analytics Workbench from Fastcase and its recently acquired docket-tracking company Docket Alarm. The idea of the Workbench is to allow legal professionals to build their own bespoke litigation analytics across any court, practice area or litigation event.

Visually, the analytics you create in Workbench look like Docket Alarm’s existing analytics product, PTAB Predictive Analytics. The difference is that these same analytics can be applied to virtually any court or type of docket activity. (Docket Alarm includes all federal dockets but is limited in its coverage of state dockets.) Michael Sander, Docket Alarm’s founder and CEO, said the goal is to make it easy for attorneys to create custom analytics, without requiring sophisticated tech expertise.

Wandering the exhibit hall, I was able to get updates from several companies I’m familiar with and make introductions with several I had not seen before. There will be more to come on this blog about some of those companies.

But something I heard over and over again from the vendors at AALL mirrors what I said above about the changing role of law librarians. Law librarians get it, the vendors said. They understand the importance of technology in advancing the legal profession, and they are more likely than other legal professionals to understand the mechanics of technology, to be able to get under the hood and size up whether a product is what it claims to be.

We see this at law firms, where law librarians are often the gatekeepers for new technology, helping to vet and evaluate products before their firms plunk down precious dollars. We see this at law schools, where law librarians are often at the forefront of pushing for teaching and program initiatives in technology innovation and competence. We see this in court systems and government agencies, where law librarians are often helping to lead the charge for expanding access to justice. Continue reading

Tune In to The Geek in Review (and Geek Out with 2 Legal Information Professionals)

Earlier this week, we highlighted Saskia Mehlhorn, who will be presenting at three AALL sessions.  Today, we’re highlighting two other very active private law librarians and information professionals who will be taking part in this year’s AALL Annual Meeting—Marlene Gebauer, Director of Knowledge Solutions at Greenberg Traurig LLP, and Greg Lambert, Chief Knowledge Services Officer at Jackson Walker, and outgoing AALL president.

Greg started the popular and long-running 3 Geeks and a Law Blog about ten years ago with Toby Brown and Lisa Sophia Salazar, and he and Marlene Gebauer recently launched an accompanying podcast, The Geek in Review. Their first episode featured competitive intelligence guru Zena Applebaum, who offered insights on life as a “non” (as in non-lawyer, or even non-librarian) at a law firm.

Next, Greg and Marlene delved into Casetext’s development and vision with Casetext founder Pablo Arredondo. They also discussed the market for legal information startups generally, the next wave of legal tech, and the role librarians play in vetting new offerings.  Cas Laskowski of Duke Law School, and of the Firebrand Lib blog, was interviewed for their third airing.  The interview with Cas was a follow-up to her April blog post about impact-conscious design models.

Most recently, Marlene hosted former lawyer and knowledge management professional Ayelette Robinson, who now has a career in acting and production.  Marlene and Ayelette discussed how acting, voice-over and/or improv training can benefit professionals generally, and the importance of being yourself in your professional interactions.

You can listen to the podcast on Anchor, anchor.fm/geekinreview, or on iTunes, itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-geek-in-review.

Episode 1:  Living the “Non” Life in Law Firms

Episode 2:  Being a Legal Information Startup

Episode 3:  Let’s Discuss Impact-Conscious Design

Episode 4:  Understanding How to Place the Focus on Others

You can also follow Greg and Marlene on Twitter:
Greg Lambert (@glambert) and Marlene Gebauer (@gebauerm)

At the conference, Greg will participate in a TED-style format session, “TEDAALL: Library Leaders Share Their Ethics Stories and Challenges.”  Library leaders will give short TED-style presentations discussing important ethical issues in library research, technology, human resources, data management, and other services.

Marlene will be participating in The Tech-Savvy Law Librarian, an event hosted by Above the Law and the Evolve the Law community that is taking place Sunday evening at SPARK Baltimore. David Lat, founder and managing editor of Above the Law, and Dean Sonderegger, Vice President and General Manager for Legal Markets and Innovation at Wolters Kluwer Legal & Regulatory U.S., will discuss “How Can Law Librarians Drive the Future of Law Practice.”  Their conversation will be followed by two-minute elevator pitches from legal tech innovators, followed by four minutes of Q&A from David and Marlene. Innovators pitching will include CasetextCourtroom Insight, and SimplyAgree.