About Cheryl Niemeier

Cheryl Niemeier is Director of Knowledge & Research Services at Bose McKinney & Evans LLP. Ms. Niemeier received her Master of Science in Library Science from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana in 1986 and her Bachelor of Science in Education from Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana in 1981. Ms. Niemeier has held multiple professional leadership positions in local, regional and national library associations. She frequently speaks at professional association conferences and continuing legal education seminars. Ms. Niemeier has authored multiple articles and seminar publications.

A 360 View: Essential Steps for a Successful Next-Gen Online Catalog Upgrade (Part 2 – Implementation)

KLEW

Co-authored by Cheryl Niemeier, Director of Knowledge & Research Services, Bose McKinney & Evans, LLP, and Michayla Sullivan, Knowledge & Research Services Specialist, Bose McKinney & Evans LLP

Congratulations, you’ve selected your online catalog system! After you have decided on a new platform and signed the contract, you will need to implement the new system. The general stages of implementation are:

  • Record migration
  • Library employee training
  • Product customization
  • Promotion of OPAC

The implementation process involves several considerations. Your new vendor should be able to help you bulk import your old library records to your new system. As mentioned in Part 1 of this post, hopefully you’ve made absolutely certain to double-check on this functionality before you signed the contract. The lack of this service is a deal-breaker. Even the smallest law libraries can have thousands of records that are critical for day-to-day operations. An inability to import records in bulk or compatibility issues between the old and new systems could make the migration process difficult, lengthy, and possibly not worth the associated time and cost. Some larger libraries also may have the same consideration for patron records.

The new generation of library catalog systems tend to have far more functionality than older ones, therefore, a surprising amount of training may be needed for your staff. Expect to spend weeks or even months discovering all the new features and how to use them. Be sure that your library staff has at least 10-15 hours over the first several weeks to dedicate to initial training with the vendor, reading manuals, and/or watching training videos. Also, account for extra staff time spent on performing routine tasks in the new system. Allowing for some overtime during the transition period also may be necessary.

After you have mastered the features available in the new system, you will need to spend time customizing it to your needs. Your vendor may be able to help you with some of this, but much of it will be left to you. Depending on which product you go with, the biggest customization may be designing your OPAC. You not only will have to design its overall appearance; you also will need time to determine which features to make available to your patrons. Which search fields will you make available? Will there be links to outside resources? If so, which ones? Will your patrons be allowed to add and remove themselves to serials routing lists? Do you want them to use the OPAC to submit reference requests? After you have answered and implemented all of your customized features, time devoted to testing them is essential.

Build it and they will come? This may hold true in some instances, but no matter what, make a plan to promote the OPAC to the employees at your firm. Every library catalog needs name—one way to get people excited about your new online catalog is to ask for name suggestions or have a naming contest. Next up is announcing the chosen name and arranging demonstrations of the catalog at your firm’s practice group meetings. Also, don’t forget to demonstrate it to the paralegals and secretaries at their meetings. If your firm has an intranet, position the link to the OPAC prominently. Lastly, in the ensuing months make sure to remind people about the OPAC whenever you get the chance. As people call asking where a certain book is kept or if the latest issue of a favorite current awareness journal is in yet, take the opportunity to remind them about your new catalog system.

Advantages abound in moving up to a next-generation online catalog system. Chief among them is the ability to offer attorneys seamless access to the entire universe of resources in your library’s collection. The benefits of doing so far outweigh the time and effort needed to make it happen.

 

A 360 View: Essential Steps for a Successful Next-Gen Online Catalog Upgrade (Part 1 – System Selection)

By Cheryl Niemeier, Director of Knowledge & Research Services, Bose McKinney & Evans, LLP, and Michayla Sullivan, Knowledge & Research Services Specialist, Bose McKinney & Evans LLP

OPAC

A mere thirty to forty years ago, albeit light years ago in terms of technology, most law firm libraries were converting from card catalogs to online catalogs. The records contained in those old online catalogs were largely bibliographic records for print titles. However, the balance of records in today’s online catalogs has shifted to primarily records for electronic titles. Due to this change, many law libraries may be contemplating upgrading to next-generation online catalog systems. Doing so entails several considerations and steps. Continue reading

Interview of Research Services Librarian Yael Rosenblatt

This post introduces Yael Rosenblatt, Research Services Librarian at Reed Smith in New York.

What was your path to law librarianship?

Law librarianship was a natural outgrowth of my 9+ years spent at Westlaw which brought me into contact with some of the largest firms in New York City.  I really enjoyed seeing what law librarians do and was so impressed by the wide range of projects within the law firm that they were involved with.  I believed my skill set would dovetail nicely with that and was excited when an opportunity presented itself.

Did you have a mentor or librarian who helped you and/or influenced your work style/ethic?

I was fortunate to work with so many smart and talented librarians at many firms and to observe many different work styles and many different work settings.  I think most of the librarians I had contact with have served as a mentor for me in his or her own way.  I have tried to adopt for myself some of the qualities I most admire.  Since moving to Reed Smith, Brian Blaho’s help and guidance has obviously been invaluable to me.  I have also kept in regular contact with many of my librarian contacts who have provided lots of advice.

How has your job evolved from the time you first began your career?

My career really began when I served as law clerk for a judge in New Jersey.  Even then, I always loved research.  I even served as a research assistant for a professor in law school.  I transitioned to Westlaw and so my focus was exclusively on Westlaw , and eventually on the whole suite of Thomson Reuters’ legal offerings – and how those products can bring value and efficiency to lawyers and law firms.   Now my focus (in terms of research) is finding out how each product I have access to can bring value to the work I am doing.  It’s a learning curve – and it’s exciting to learn — in depth – about other resources.

What is your biggest challenge at work?

Currently my biggest challenge is still learning about all of the available resources.  I have so many great research tools to choose from.  It takes time to figure out what is available and then what is the most cost effective and thorough research platform to use in the particular instance.

What part of your job do you enjoy the most?

I enjoy working with all different people in a law firm – and I enjoy learning about the diverse practice areas.  In my prior position, I always tried to meet attorneys in different practice areas.  I’ve continued trying to do that and enjoy working with corporate attorneys as well as litigators.  It keep things challenging and interesting.

How do you keep up with news and trends in law libraries?

I joined AALL and the local library associations.  I also follow popular blogs.  The librarians in my firm are also great about meeting regularly to keep in touch and keep each other up to date.

What job would you have if you had not become a law librarian?

I would be a private investigator.  I love the quest for information.  It keeps things interesting!

How do you reach out to your attorneys to let them know how the library can help them?

I am fortunate that I get a chance to meet with each and every attorney that starts – whether they are new associates or laterals or partners.  In this way, I can impress upon them the many ways the library can help them and show them what an essential resource the library team can be.

Law Firm Information Professional Elected to the AALL Executive Board

Congratulations to Jean O’Grady, Director of Research & Knowledge Services at DLA Piper on her election to Board member of the 2017-2018 American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) Executive Board.

As a blogger for Dewey B Strategic Jean has always championed the roles of private law firm information professionals and she has been active for many years in AALL and the Private Law Libraries and Information Professionals-Special Interest Section of AALL. We are proud of her and know she will be a great spokesperson on the Board for law firm librarians and all law librarians and legal information professionals.

New Vendor on the Block: An Interview with co-Founders of Start-up Company Clause

An interview with Houman Shadab and Peter Hunn of startup company Clause.

What is your background?

Clause was co-founded by Houman Shadab and Peter Hunn. Houman is a former BigLaw attorney turned professor of financial law. He has always had an interest in technology, and in recent years increasingly focused on how recent rapid advances in technology can impact business law. Peter read for multiple law degrees in the UK, worked in private equity, and was involved in startups that were funded by leading accelerator programs.

Why did you create this product?

We created this product to bring contracts into the 21st Century by connecting them to the physical world that surrounds them. This means that legal contracts are able to respond to dynamic and data-driven changes. Doing so will help to automate commercial processes, significantly reduce inefficiencies, and create new business models. Contracts unfortunately still remain largely unchanged from how they’ve been for millennia: static documents that capture parties’ agreements at a point in time.

What was missing from the market and how do you think your product will address/solve this need?

What is currently missing from the market is: (a) a way for parties’ contractual and broader commercial relationships to reflect, respond to, and monitor, in real-time, the changing world around them and (b) a system that can extensibly work with the other services that enterprises and attorneys use.

Clause offers a revolutionary new contracting paradigm that uses proprietary technology developed over the last year to enable commercial contracts to ‘come alive’ and autonomously manage themselves in response to the state of the physical world through real-time data from the Internet of Things, data streams or APIs. For example, when a manufacturer orders parts and there are a lot more defects than expected, an autonomous contract will reduce the invoice price, extend the warranty coverage, and refund payments automatically. An autonomous legal contract can also search for and replace an existing supplier in response to persistent part defects. But these contracts can also help suppliers: severe weather conditions or an earthquake that delays delivery or drives up supply costs could immediately be reflected in a price increase or revised delivery schedule. Ultimately, autonomous contracts create value for both parties by enabling pricing and other terms to instantaneously adjust in response data analytics, including about profit margins, delivery times, and the correlation between sales and location. This helps to solve the pervasive business and contract management problem of contracts being inflexible and not reflecting the changing world around them.

What are the future plans for your product as it relates to helping with attorney’s transactional documents?

Attorneys’ transactional documents will become a more integrated part of their clients’ business by being plugged into and reflecting the company’s current operations. Our product will help lawyers know the status of contract performance and history in real-time and thereby help them to advise their clients with respect to contract compliance, re-negotiations, and their standing in case a dispute arises.

How can law librarians/legal information professionals partner with you and what would be the benefits of the partnership?

We can partner by integrating our platform with developments that impact contracting, from transactional trends to legal developments that may require new terms and structures or undermine enforceability.

Have you or do you plan to attend events or exhibit your product at any upcoming law library, legal, or legal technology association meetings?

Yes, we are planning on attending several events in 2017. We would be happy to demonstrate to the AALL.

For more information about Clause read The World’s First ‘IoT-Enabled’ Legal Contract and feel free to contact them via their blog: www.medium.com/@clause or Email: peter@clause.io or follow them on Twitter: @clauseHQ